David Zwirner, London
21 June – 3 August, 2013
24 Grafton Street, London W1S 4EZ
+44 20 3538 3165
www.davidzwirner.com

From the early 1960s up until the time of his death, Donald Judd developed a rigorous visual vocabulary that sought clear and definite objects as its primary mode of articulation. Together, the works in this exhibition present an overview of many of Judd’s signature forms and offer insight into his singular commitment to material, colour, and proportion.

One of the most significant American artists of the postwar period, Judd’s oeuvre has come to define what has been referred to as Minimalist art—a label to which the artist strongly objected on the grounds of its generality. In 1965, Judd published his now-canonical treatise “Specific Objects,” in which he eschewed the classical ideals of representational painting and sculpture in favour of work that was objective and straightforward and that avoided grand philosophical statements.

The works presented here, which span the course of Judd’s career, explore the primary preoccupations of the artist’s practice, such as the relationships between surface and volume, interior and exterior space, as well as material and form. Highlights from the exhibition include untitled, 1964, a large-scale rounded square form that sits on the floor and is executed in galvanised iron and coated in the artist’s favored cadmium red; untitled, 1965,
an early box format executed in transparent red Plexiglas and stainless steel; examples of Judd’s multi-coloured “Swiss boxes” and “progressions” executed in painted and anodized aluminium; untitled, 1989, a horizontal sequence of four wall-mounted boxes executed in unadorned Douglas fir plywood; and a significant stack executed in coloured Plexiglas and metal.