“Our understanding of a mirror is that it’s reflecting the ‘now’, ‘the moment’, says the New York-based Israeli artist Ron Gilad. “In these mirrors the ‘now’ is being infused with the ‘was’ or the ‘might have been’,” he says, referring to his latest project, IX Mirrors. Shown at Milanese gallery Dilmos during Salone del Mobile 2011, Gilad’s series of nine mirrors was one of the most talked about installations at the fair. Within simple rectangular frames, he created mirrors that were fused with surrealist details (see the mirror with the baroque framed hole cut at head height) or unexpected details (see those pieces where the glass appeared to be lifted or pulled by miniature porcelain figures) that offered an alternative to the reflection of reality. Infused not only with artistry but also with history – a number of pieces feature the addition of Venetian fabrics, Byzantine mosaics made and other references to Italy’s heritage – his mirrors also offer a reflection that combines past and present. Characteristic of the artist’s fascination with philosophizing about the common objects we live with, the mirrors force the viewer to comprehend a different vision. As Dimos comments: “Gilad suggests that the mirrored image contains a hypocrisy which reflects only our exterior selves. He is asking us to contemplate a more complex and poetic possibility of reality. The title, like the nine lives of a cat, represents the possibility of inner lives or the soul of the mirror.”


“In the very beginning of life, we first become aware of our existence by being mirrored in the eyes and faces of those around us. The foundation of the sense of who we are in the world begins here. As our awareness grows, the mirror as an object becomes an additional tool for self reflection. Ron Gilad suggests that the mirrored image contains a hypocrisy which reflects only our exterior selves. He is asking us to contemplate a more complex and poetic possibility of reality. The title, like the nine lives of a cat, represents the possibility of inner lives or the soul of the mirror.”
- Dilmos Gallery