Ferrari
250 GT Cabriolet
Series II
1961
$1,600,000 – $2,000,000

An extremely rare version of Ferrari’s famous Pininfarina-designed 250 series, this cabriolet was bought by its current Italian owner in 2008 who called on specialist Rossocorso to fully restore the vehicle to “concours” standards.

p.4

Aston Martin
DB2/4 Mk II
‘Supersonic’
1956
$1,800,000 - $2,400,000

“The Supersonic is the perfect name for one of the 1950s coolest cars; its sensational, jet-inspired shape [was] created by a true genius of a designer and engineer, Giovanni
Savonuzzi. So formidable were his talents that two of his designs were called “Savonuzzi Streamliners.” Yet [Carrozzeria] Ghia only did one Aston, making it the rarest of the Supersonics.”
- Winston Goodfellow, Automobile Expert & Writer

p.15

Rolls-Royce
Phantom II Continental
Sports Coupe
1933
$2,000,000 – $2,800,000

A one-off Art Deco coupe that was commissioned by Rolls Royce connoisseur Sir John Leigh, this spectacular car was built by Freestone & Web, considered to be London’s leading coachbuilders at the time. Leigh requested a sporty exterior and so a long hoodline was created which created a visual trick that gives the car the appearance of being a sleek two-seater when in fact it has a four-passenger compartment.

p.5

Auburn
Twelve Custom
Spedster
1933
$1,000,000 – $1,600,000

Alan Leamy of the Auburn Automobile Company is considered an artist of automobile styling and his company’s “boattail” speedster is thought of as some of his best work – an Art Deco sensation with its angled door lines, two-tone color scheme and swept-back pointed tail.

p.3

Delahaye
Type 135 Competition
Court Teardrop Coupe
1936
Coachwork by Carrosserie Figoni et Falaschi
$3,000,000 – $4,000,000

Joseph Figoni of renowned coachbuilders Carrosserie Figoni et Falaschi saw cars in terms of curves and his Delahaye Type 135 Competition Court Teardrop Coupé is the ultimate expression of his signature style. This model is one of three surviving Figoni short-chassis coupes and is the only example that is equipped with highly desirable integrated headlights.

p.1

Plymouth
Road Runner
Superbird
1970
$400,000 – $500,000

p.11

Mercedes-Benz
300 SL Gullwing
1955
$1,300,000 – $1,500,000

The Mercedes 300 SL is a design classic with its iconic gullwing doors. This model is more rare than most being one of only 19 ordered in a striking shade of light green and rarer again with its red leather interior.

p.9

Ferrari
250 Europa GT Coupé
1955
$2,250,000 – 2,750,000

Although the 250 Europe is considered to be the finest example of Pinin Farina’s iconic 1950s Ferrari “look”, this is the 26th of just 43 examples that were produced. After an extensive restoration was completed in mid-2006, the car made its premier at the 56th annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and was also shown at the 26th Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach, Florida, where it was awarded with both a Platinum Award and
the Excellence Cup, which was awarded based on the high quality of its restoration and the
uniqueness of the automobile itself.

p.8

Talbot-Lago
T150-C SS Teardrop Cabriolet
1938
Coachwork by Figoni et Falaschi
$8,000,000 – 10,000,000

Another design by Parisian firm Figoni et Falaschi, this Art Deco landmark vehicle was commissioned by Talbot-Lago, whose mission was to build the finest French cars of the era. It was the first in the series of Figoni et Falaschi Teardrop Cabriolets.

p.12

Duesenberg
Model SJ Beverly
1933
Coachwork by Walter M. Murphy Company
$2,000,000 – $2,500,000

“The Beverly is one of [Duesenberg’s chief body designer] Gordon Buehrig’s most recognized Duesenberg body styles. Its low silhouette and prominently slanted windshield created an elegant and well-proportioned body design. With its full fabric covered top, which extended down to the belt line, and its V-shaped B-pillar, the Beverly provided both a clean and tight greenhouse of a sedan and the lightness of a convertible top. Not only did Buehrig
pen the exterior, but also the interior, with its rear seat armchair, and cabinetry, with passenger instrumentation, designed to create symmetry of appearance.”
- Aaron Warkentin, Curator of the ACD Automobile Museum

p.7

Oldsmobile
Ninety-Eight
Convertible
1958
$275,000 – $375,000

Described by RM Auctions as “the ultimate American automobile of Detroit’s Chrome
Age”, this is considered to be the finest example of the Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Convertible in existence and is the winner of numerous show awards.

p.2

Lincoln
Indianapolis Exclusive Study
1955
Coachwork by Carozz Eria Boano Torino
$2,000,000 – $2,500,000

A one-off concept car designed by Gian Carlo Boano of Carozz Eria Boano Torino, the Lincoln Indianapolis won car of the show at the 1955 Turin Automobile Salon. Inspired by aircraft, it is considered to be one of the most important surviving concept designs of the 1950s.

p.18

F.M.R.
Tg 500 ‘Tiger’
1960
$150,000 – $225,000

Considered the crème de la crème of the microcar industry that emerged after the end of World War II, the Tg 500 ‘Tiger’ was designed by German engineer Fritz Fend, who had founded Messerschmitt. This model is larger than most other Messerschmitt microcars, with four large seats and a bigger engine with a top speed of 78 mph.

p.13

Maserati
A6G/2000 Spyder
1955
Coachwork by Carrozzeria Zagato
$3,500,000 – $4,500,000

The most beautiful Maserati ever? This one-of-a-kind car was the only Maserati to be designed by celebrated coachbuilder Zagato. Debuted at the 1955 Geneva Salon and 1958 Paris Motor Show, it has since been meticulously restored.

p.10

Flying Merkel
Model 471
1914
$200,000 – $250,000

Joseph Merkel was considered one of the most brilliant minds of the American motorcycle industry and it was the Flying Merkel which made him. “All roads are smooth to the Flying Merkel,” his company boasted of the model which from 1910 featured its name painted in a comet trail of letters visible even from a distance.

p.14

Chevrolet
CERV II
1964
Design by Larry Shinoda and Tony Lapine
Engineered by Zora Arkus-Duntov
$1,400,000 – $1,800,000

Engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov is regaded as the “Father of the Corvette” for having transformed the cruiser into a sports car by giving it a powerful V-8 engine. In the early 1960s rumours circulated that the next Corvette would be mid-engined, in keeping with the developments at Ferrari and Ford. The rumours were largely based on facts, as Chevrolet had been one step away from such a car with its radically different “Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle II” (CERV II), an extraordinary four-wheel drive concept.

p.6

Ferrari
250 LM
1964
Coachwork by Carrozzeria Scaglietti
$12,000,000 – $15,000,000

“Ferrari’s 250 LM is one of the most spectacular mid-engined sports cars ever built,” says Marcel Massini, the renowned Ferrari historian. “A true competition race car rarer than the legendary 250 GTO, and the last Ferrari to win the gruelling 24-hour race at Le Mans.” It is offered for sale publicly for the first time in decades.